Monthly Archives: September 2018

The Children Act – Film Review

As the title suggests, The Children Act is a bill introduced in 1989 to reform British law relating to minors. Its intent is to ensure that all children are safeguarded and that their welfare should be the overriding concern of the courts, while taking into account the child’s wishes, including the harm a child may […]

Posted in Film

Lizzie – Film Review

There’s a lot we know about Lizzie Borden, but there’s more we don’t. We know she was tried for the murders of her father and her stepmother in 1892. We know she never married, and we know she remained in Fall River, Massachusetts until she died of pneumonia, aged 66. Yet, despite the children’s folk […]

Posted in Film

The House with a Clock in the Walls – Film Review

After his popularity with teenage horror audiences in the creepy 2015 release, Goosebumps, Jack Black returns to that same young adult market as a friendly, kimono wearing warlock of dubious magical talents in the fantasy horror, The House with a Clock in its Walls. Based on the 1973 novel of the same by John Bellairs, […]

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Fahrenheit 11/9 – Film Review

There’s every possibility that Michael Moore’s new political documentary will not be quite as you expect. The diatribe against the 45th president of the United States that the right anticipated and the left might have hoped-for is largely absent. That’s neither the theme nor the filmmaker’s intention. Though, considering the litany of social media attacks […]

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The First Annual Book Burners Convention – Theatre Review: Space 55 Theatre

Having worked at both Zia Records and Half Price Books, if there’s anyone who must know a thing or two about used bookstores, the people who shop there, and what it’s like to come across the occasional interesting item, it would be Ashley Naftule. Currently, the Associate Artistic Director for Space 55, the valley’s small, […]

Posted in Theatre

White Guy on the Bus – Theatre Review: iTheatre Collaborative, Herberger Theater Center’s Kax Theater, Phoenix

The opening of playwright Bruce Graham’s most recent work, White Guy on the Bus, floods the wide, expansive set with images of the stock market. They move about in patterns; projected images appearing as they would when enlarged from a widescreen TV monitor, accompanied by a cacophony of overlapping voices from various cable news stations, […]

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